Destructive Power Plants of Bangladesh

Destructive Power Plants of Bangladesh. Graphics: CLEAN

  1. Anwara Coal Power Plant: Anwara, Chittagong: 1300 MW (Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Japan): Proposed
  2. Bangladesh-Singapore Coal Power Plant (Phase-I): Matarbari, Maheshkhali Upazila, Cox's Bazar: 700 MW (Sembcorp, Singapore): Proposed 
  3. Bangladesh-Singapore Coal Power Plant (Phase-II): Matarbari, Maheshkhali Upazila, Cox's Bazar: 700 MW (Singapore): Proposed 
  4. Banshkhali Coal Power Plant (Beximco): Banshkhali, Chittagong: 660 MW (Power China Resources Ltd (PCR): Proposed  
  5. Banshkhali Coal Power Plant (S. Alam Group) also called Chittagong Coal Power Plant: Banshkhali, Chittagong: 1224 MW (Shandong Electric Power Construction Corporation (SEPCO3) and STG Development Group, China): Under Construction 
  6. Barapukuria Coal Power Plant (Phase-I): Bara Pukuria, Parbatipur, Dinajpur: 250 MW: In Operation  
  7. Barapukuria Coal Power Plant (Phase-II): Bara Pukuria, Parbatipur, Dinajpur (Harbin Electric and CCC Engineering, China): 275 MW: In Operation 
  8. Barisal 307 MW Coal Based IPP Power Plant: Taltoli, Barguna: ISO Tech Electrification Limited (Bangladesh) and Power China Resources Ltd (PCR): 300-350 MW: Agreement Signed 
  9. Bhola Integrated Power Plant (Bhola IPP or Bhola II): Borhanuddin, Bhola (Nutan Biddut Bangladesh Limited (NBBL), subsidiary of Shapoorji Pallonji Group, India): Funded by Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (USD 60 Million): Under Construction 
  10. Boalkhali Coal Power Plant (Beximco): Boalkhali, Chittagong: 660 MW: China Energy Engineering Group (CEEG), and Power China Resources Ltd (PCR): Proposed 
  11. Chittagong Coal Power Plant (Orion Group): Banshkhali, Chittagong: 283 MW: Under Construction
  12. CPGCPL-Mitsui LNG Combined Cycle Power Plant (Phase-I): Matarbari, Maheshkhali Upazila, Cox's Bazar: 500 MW (Japan): Proposed 
  13. CPGCPL-Mitsui LNG Combined Cycle Power Plant (Phase-II): Matarbari, Maheshkhali Upazila, Cox's Bazar: 500 MW (Japan): Proposed 
  14. CPGCPL-Sumitomo Coal Power Plant: Matarbari, Maheshkhali Upazila, Cox's Bazar: 1200 MW (Japan): Proposed 
  15. Daudkandi Coal Power Plant (Meghna Group): Daudkandi, Comilla: 1320 MW (Power Construction Corporation (ChinaPower), China): Proposed  
  16. Dighipara Ultra Super Critical Thermal Power Plant (NWPGCL-PCR): Dighipara, Dinajpur: North-West Power Generation Company Limited (NWPGCL) and Power China Resources Ltd (PCR): 1000 (500X2) MW: Proposed  
  17. Gazaria Coal Power Plant (RPCL-China): Imampur Union (Sholo Ani and Daulatpur Village), Gazaria, Munshiganj: 350 MW: Rural Power Company Limited (RPCL) under concessional loan from Chinese Government (Contractor: Power China Resources Ltd (PCR) and Hubei Hongyuan Power Engineering Company Limited): 330.60 Acre of Land taken from people 
  18. Khulna South Coal Power Plant (Orion Group): Mongla, Bagerhat: 650 MW (Mongla, Bagerhat): Proposed 
  19. Maheshkhali Coal Power Plant (BPDB-Huadian): Maheshkhali, Cox's Bazar: 1320 MW (China Huadian Hong Kong Company Ltd, China): Proposed 
  20. Maheshkhali Coal Power Plant (BPDB-KEPCO): Maheshkhali, Cox's Bazar: 1320 MW (KEPCO, South Korea): Proposed
  21. Maheshkhali Coal Power Plant (BPDB-PCR): Maheshkhali, Cox's Bazar: 1320 MW (Sepco Electric Power Construction Corporation and Power China Resources Ltd (PCR): Proposed  
  22. Maheshkhali Coal Power Plant (BPDB-TNB-Powertek): Maheshkhali, Cox's Bazar: 1320 MW (Tenaga Nasional Berhad (TNB), Malaysia): Proposed  
  23. Matarbari Coal Power Plant (Phase-I): Matarbari-Dhalghata, Maheshkhali Upazila, Cox's Bazar: 1200 MW (JICA, Japan): Under Construction 
  24. Matarbari Coal Power Plant (Phase-II): Matarbari-Dhalghata, Maheshkhali Upazila, Cox's Bazar: 1200 MW (Japan): Proposed  
  25. Matarbari LNG Power Plant (CPGCBL-Mitusi): Matarbari-Dhalghata, Maheshkhali Upazila, Cox's Bazar: 600-700 MW (Japan): MOU Signed 
  26. Mawa Coal Power Plant (Orion Group): Mawa, Munshiganj: 522 MW: Under Construction 
  27. Mirsarai Coal Power Plant: Mirsarai, Chittagong: 1320 MW (Hangzhou Jinjiang Group Co Ltd., China; Hangzhou Zhengcai Holding Group Co Ltd, China and Jindun Energy Equipment Ltd., Hong Kong): Proposed 
  28. Munshiganj Coal Power Plant (EGCBL): Munshiganj: Electricity Generation Company of Bangladesh Limited (EGCBL): 300-400 MW: Administration Approved, 300 Acre Land Purchase Approved, Feasibility Study done  
  29. Patuakhali Coal Power Plant (RPCL-Norinco): Dhankhali Union (Nishanbaria, Dhanbari, Londa Village), Kalapara, Patuakhali: 1320 MW: RPCL-Norinco Intl Power Limited (RNPL) (a joint venture of Rural Power Company Limited (RPCL) and Norinco International Corporation Limited, China): Under Construction 
  30. Payra Coal Power Plant: Payra, Kalapara, Patuakhali: 1320 MW: China National Energy Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd. (CECC) and China National Machinery Import and Export Corporation (CMC): Under Construction  
  31. Payra LNG Power Plant: Payra, Kalapara, Patuakhali: North-West Power Generation Company Limited (NWPGCL) and Siemens AG (Germany): 3600 (3x1200) MW: MOU Signed, Joint Development Agreement Approved  
  32. Pekua Coal Power Plant: Pekua, Cox's Bazar: 1200 (2 X 600) MW: Electricity Generation Company of Bangladesh Limited (EGCBL) and Mitsui & Company Limited (Japan): Adminstrative Approval (30 Nov 2014); Government Approval (26 Jan 2015); Land Acquisition Approval (8 Mar 2016); Land Acquisition Fund Transferred (22 Jun 2017); MOU Signed with Mitsui (17 Nov 2016): Under Construction  
  33. Rampal Coal Power Plant: Rampal, Bagerhat: 1320 MW (National Thermal Power Company Limited - NTPC, India): Under Construction 
  34. Reliance Meghnaghat Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant, Meghnaghat, Narayanganj [Reliance Power Limited (India): Financed by Asian Development Bank (ADB)]: 750 MW
  35. Rupsha 800-Megawatt Combined Cycle Power Plant: Rupsha, Khulna: 800 MW (North-West Power Generation Company Limited - NWPGCL and Asian Development Bank (ADB): Proposed 
  36. Summit Meghnaghat 335 MW Power Plant: HSD and Gas: Summit Group and USD 30 Million financed by Asian Development Bank (ADB): 335 MW

Ensuring Justice for the Women in and effectiveness of Global Clean Cooking Program - Bangladesh (GCF Project # FP070)

1. BACKGROUND
Green Climate Fund (GCF), the new multi-billion climate fund, was designated as an operating entity of the financial mechanism of the UNFCCC, in accordance with Article 11 of the UNFCCC. The COP 16 brings the issue into light and after COP 20, now GCF has become successful to a certain extent in initial resource mobilization process that led to the mobilization of $10.3 billion to date by contributing parties. The institution was proposed in 2009 Copenhagen Conference, Denmark and formed in 2010 Cancun Conference, Mexico. Headquartered in Songdo, South Korea, GCF started funding in 2015. 

Bangladesh has been very active in the UNFCCC negotiations for long and has also taken a pragmatic approach as soon as the GCF emerged. In September 2014, the government of Bangladesh nominated Economic Relations Division (ERD) of Ministry of Finance as the National Designated Authority (NDA) of Bangladesh to GCF. As per standard procedure, NDAs are chosen by governments to act as the core interface between a country and the Fund. NDAs provide broad oversight of GCF’s activities in a country and serve as the point of communication with the Fund.

Bangladesh has received one of the very first funding and since then Bangladesh has received three projects from GCF. The projects funded by GCF in Bangladesh are: 
  1. Climate-Resilient Infrastructure Mainstreaming in Bangladesh (FP004) through German Development Bank (KfW) 
  2. Enhancing adaptive capacities of coastal communities, especially women, to cope with climate change induced salinity (FP069) through United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Global
  3. Clean Cooking Program – Bangladesh (FP070) through World Bank (International Bank for Reconstruction and Development and International Development Association)

2. PROJECT FEATURES 
  • Name of the Project: Global Clean Cooking Program – Bangladesh (FP070) 
  • Location: Whole Bangladesh 
  • Coverage: Commercially dissemination of 4 million ICS 
  • Project Period: 3.5 Years (1 June 2018 - 31 December 2021) 
  • ESF Risk Category (GCF): C 
  • First Submission of Proposal: 23 June 2017 
  • Final Submission of Proposal: 16 March 2018 
  • Date of Approval: March 2018 
  • Funding Agency: Green Climate Fund (GCF) 
  • Lending Agency: International Development Association (IDA) 
  • Management Agency: The World Bank (International Bank for Reconstruction and Development and International Development Association) 
  • National Designated Authority (NDA): Economic Relations Division (ERD), Ministry of Finance (MOF)  
  • Implementing Agency: Infrastructure Development Company Limited (IDCOL) and its partners
  • Total Budget: USD 82.7 Million 
  • Component 1: Scaling-up Investment in Improved Cook-stoves: GCF USD 18,000,000.00; WB/IDA USD 10,100,000.00; Local Beneficiary USD 42,170,000.00: Total USD 70.27 Million 
  • Component 2: Technical Assistance to Enhance Supplier Capacity and Demand: GCF USD 574,444.93; WB/IDA USD 2,836,454.27: Total USD 3.41 Million 
  • Project Management Costs: GCF USD 1,425,555.07; WB/IDA USD 6,663,545.73: Total USD 8.49 Million 
  • Contingency: WB/IDA USD 400,000.00 

Financiers 
  • International Development Association (IDA): Soft loan: USD 20.00 Million
  • Local Beneficiaries: Contribution to Buy Improved Cook-stoves: USD 42.17 Million
  • Green Climate Fund (GCF): Grant: USD 20.00 Million 

Project Objective 
To reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, solid fuel use for cooking and Household Air Pollution (HAP) in Bangladesh by creating a sustainable market for higher efficiency cook-stoves in the country. The widespread introduction of Improved Cook-Stoves (ICS) will have significant health benefits on rural population in Bangladesh by reducing the exposure of households to HAP and creating a safe indoors environment, which will primarily benefit women and children. 

Specific Objectives 
  • Component 1: To leverage private-sector finance through purchases made by end users equivalent to the total size of the Project.
  • Component 2: To provide technical assistance to enhance supplier capacity on the one hand and increase the demand for ICS among end users on the other hand. 

Specific Outcome: Commercially dissemination of 4 million Improved Cook-Stoves (ICS) 
Emission Reduction: Approximately 2.9 Million Tonnes of Carbon-Di-Oxide emission avoided 

Potential NGO Partners 
  • COAST Trust
  • Gana Unnyan Kendra (GUK)
  • Independent University Bangladesh (IUB)
  • Jago Nari
  • Khan Foundation
  • Maleya Foundation
  • Trinamul Unnayan Sangstha (TUS)


3. INITIAL OBSERVATION ON THE PROJECT
  • The rural women are the worst victims of climate crisis in Bangladesh. They are also victimized due to patriarchal culture and social superstitions. So, they are ethically entitled to get reparations for adaptation and betterment of their lives and livelihoods. But this project will further trap them in credits to avail the improved cook-stoves.
  • The project will benefit the commercial producers of improved cook-stoves and market mechanism of oven which will ultimately deprive the rural women who will have to pay the costs of improved cook-stoves.
  • Almost 25% of Bangladeshi rural poor families are dependent on fuel-woods collected from common jungles which are free. This project will create extra burden of expenditure on rural poorest families to collect Pellets/Briquettes and improved cook-stoves from commercial producers while the rural women are quite skilled to make their own earthen ovens.
  • According to Bangladesh population census 2011, total number of rural households of Bangladesh is around 20 million. At least six international and national organizations including GIZ (1 million nos reported), USAID (325,881 nos reported), CARE, BRAC, Grameen Shakti, Proshika, their partners and Bangladesh Government [Bangladesh Climate Change Trust Fund (528,000 nos reported)] distributed or sold millions of cook-stoves in last decades. How much cook-stoves are required in the rural areas is a question now.
  • Due to burden of maintenance and market dependent fuel collection system, the cook-stoves are not popular and the women are not using those after buying from selling NGOs or producers. Providing more cook-stoves will only create more garbage in the communities.

4. OBJECTIVES OF MONITORING GCCP
  • To identify gaps and possible options to ensure women rights and justice in the Global Clean Cooking Program - Bangladesh (GCCPB)
  • To encourage targeted women participants of the project (FP070) to participate in the decision making level of clean cook-stoves.
  • To sensitize civil society, policymakers and decision-making leaders to ensure rights of women for better implementation of the project.

5. PROCESS & ACTIONS
  • Review of different literature including Secondary data, previous experience, study reports and reports of implementing organizations and producers
  • Review of different policies and legal frameworks including National Energy Policy, National Sustainable and Renewable Energy Action Plan, Project Proposal, Gender Assessment and Gender Action Plan
  • Focus Group Discussion to gather qualitative information on willingness and recommendations from the communities
  • Preparation of Draft Report
  • National Consultation on Women Rights, Market Mechanism and Effectiveness of Clean Cook-stoves with participation of around 60 persons from different sectors of the society: targeted beneficiaries, journalists, policymakers, implementing institutes, NDA representatives etc.
  • Finalization and Publication of the Report

Supported by: Asia-Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APFWLD)


CONTACT PERSON
----------------------------------------------
Israth Rabeya
Research Officer, CLEAN

Global Charter for Universal Social Protection Rights: By All, For All

We, progressive social movements, concerned with the growing social distress of people all over the world and faced with multiple problems of war, environmental degradation and climate change, rising inequalities and persistent poverty, economic crises, austerity policies and growing authoritarianism, erosion of all human rights, discrimination and intolerance, hereby plead for universal social protection to be taken as a tool for peace and social justice:
Recalling the old truth that peace is not possible without social justice, as was stated already in the Constitution of the ILO in 1919.
Recalling that the community of nations has developed a major set of rights, more particularly a Universal Declaration on Human Rights, two international Covenants on political and civil rights, on the one hand, and economic, social and cultural rights on the other hand, including a right to an adequate standard of living. Other legal instruments include more specific rights of children, women and indigenous people, as well as a right to development. These rights are universal, indivisible and inalienable.
Recalling, furthermore, that many of these rights have been adopted by regional charters, conventions and declarations and that the ILO has adopted a series of conventions, recommendations and declarations on specific economic and social rights, more particularly a Convention on the minimum standards for social security in 1952, a programme on decent work, a set of Core Labour Standards, a Declaration on Social Justice and a recommendation on national social protection floors in 2012.
Recalling, finally, that the United Nations, in its many global conferences and more recently in its 2015 programme for Sustainable Development Goals has recognized the need for social protection and the reduction of inequalities, people’s social rights as well as their link with environmental policies and rights.
Considering that social protection is justified by a social justice imperative, by aiming at sustainable human development and security, providing all people with an opportunity for a life in dignity.
Considering that social protection consists of measures aimed at reconciling civil and political citizenship, based on equality, with economic and social citizenship rights and the equal worth of all individuals.
Considering that social protection is intrinsically linked to a social process of structural social solidarity and is not a concept of charity.
Considering that social protection is a very broad concept, going beyond poverty reduction, social security and social assistance, and is aimed at eradicating and preventing poverty, reducing inequalities and ensuring decent livelihoods for all.
Considering that social protection is part of a reproduction process that cannot be de-linked from a production process while both should be aimed at the sustainability of life. This means that the components of social protection cannot be conceived of separately from the economic activities in their broadest sense.
Considering, therefore, that social protection must consist of material and immaterial elements, monetary allowances and additional in-kind support where appropriate, social services, environmental resources and factors of production.
Considering that major parts of social protection can and are to be realized immediately, though other parts will necessarily be realized in a progressive way, depending on available resources.
Considering that social protection is a primary responsibility of States, with important responsibilities to be taken by subnational authorities and social organisations, a substantial contribution is to be provided by international solidarity. International financial organisations must therefore duly take into account the need for resources for social policies and be accountable to all borrowing governments.
Considering that social protection can only fulfil the needs of people if it comes about in a participatory and democratic way, involving citizens and reflecting the diversity of their means and needs as a precondition for human development.
Deploring that as of today, globally, only 29 % of people have access to comprehensive social security systems.
Deploring that the neoliberal globalisation has pushed countries into a race to the bottom, displacing people and causing environmental damage, diminishing fiscal means, deregulating labour markets, reducing taxes and cutting social expenditures.
Deploring that the current economic and debt crisis, followed and deepened by austerity policies and growing authoritarianism have seriously eroded economic and social rights the world over, whereas populist regimes undermine social protection’s emancipatory dimension.
Deploring that labour markets are faced with negative developments of growing informalisation, precariousness and vulnerability.
Deploring that the welfare states in a certain number of countries have not adapted to the fundamental changes of economies and societies of the past decades, more particularly to past and future technological changes.
Stating that the current and future technological developments will have major consequences for labour markets that need to be tackled, amongst others, with measures of social protection, so as to turn them in positive assets, more particularly for access to social protection.
Welcoming the most recent international initiatives on social protection, such as the ILO Recommendation on social protection floors and the Sustainable Development Goals, stressing the need for their effective implementation.
We therefore agree to state that the right of all people, all over the world, to universal and comprehensive social protection systems must be based on the following principles:
  1. Social protection systems should be rights- and solidarity-based, embedded in national laws, and defined as a primary responsibility of public authorities.
  2. Social protection mechanisms should be organized on a non-profit basis.
  3. States are to guarantee comprehensive social protection systems through sustainable and solidarity-based financing, fair social contribution systems, fair and progressive tax policies and international solidarity mechanisms. 
  4. Social protection mechanisms, as homogeneous as possible, should be made available for all citizens and residents, throughout the life cycle, independent of labour market status, even if benefits, rights and obligations can differ according to national contexts, agreements and sectors. 
  5. Social protection mechanisms should at least respect the norms of ILO convention 102 of 1952, that is including health insurance, medical care and sickness benefits, unemployment benefits, labour accident insurance and benefits, pensions, family and maternity benefits, invalidity allowances, survivor’s benefits. 
  6. Social protection mechanisms should also consist of a series of social services, to be agreed on at the national level, but at least comprehend a right to water, to education (up to tertiary level), public transport, energy and communication, housing and vocational training.
  7. States should adopt the decent work programme of the ILO, as well as the core labour standards comprising more particularly the right to organize and the right to collective bargaining, social dialogue, banning of the worst forms of child labour, forced and bonded labour.
  8. States should ensure the implementation of existing minimum wages and, if lacking, adopt, with the involvement of social partners, living minimum wages that guarantee decent livelihoods for, all workers. 
  9. States should adopt adequate social assistance mechanisms so as to avoid that people fall into poverty.
  10. States should take the necessary measures so as to eliminate the gender gap in labour participation, status and pay.
  11. States are to ensure non-contributory pensions and other allowances for people who are unable to participate in the labour market.
  12. States should take the necessary measures so as to eliminate all discrimination based on gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion or sexual orientation. 
  13. States should take the necessary measures so as to avoid social dumping and reduce informality and precariousness, in line with ILO Recommendation 204, adopting clear rules for the emerging ´collaborative´ economy and the dependent self-employed, redefining and appropriately measuring ´labour´, ’employment’, ‘self-employment’ and domestic work, and introduce adequate systems of labour inspection. Emerging new technologies should duly be taken into account.
  14. States should take the necessary measures as to guarantee everyone’s livelihood, including the protection of the common goods and a right to land for peasants. 
  15. States should take the necessary measures to provide social protection an,d guarantee labour rights for all migrants. During humanitarian crises, States should assist displaced people, internally and refugees, as well as to provide safe ways to travel for both refugees and labour migrants, guaranteeing basic human rights at all times.
  16. In the development of their social protection mechanisms States are to fully involve representative social partners and civil society, so that the agreed arrangements can be considered their own; social partners and citizens should be fully, structurally and effectively involved in the design, implementation and monitoring of the systems. Social protection mechanisms established by social organisations should be supported and as much as possible be integrated into universal systems and not be undermined by a formalisation process.
  17. So as to make democratic citizen’s participation possible, States and social movements should organize political education and training sessions at the national and the local level, so as to make people aware of their rights, the mechanisms to demand the full realization of their rights and the way social protection is organized and financed.
  18. States should organize the financing of their social protection systems in such a way that all income categories contribute in a fair and equitable way, the strongest shoulders bearing the largest burden.
  19. In their international trade, investment and other agreements, States should include binding rules concerning human rights, environmental and labour rights, as well as fair and progressive tax systems. A binding treaty at the global level should ensure that IFI’s and TNCs respect human rights.
  20. States should organize their social protection mechanisms in such a way that they lead to social and economic transformation, leading to just, fair and sustainable societies, preserving human and natural life. 
We call on civil society organisations to refer to these principles when campaigning for universal social protection systems, by all and for all.
We call on parliamentarians globally to advocate for and legislate universal, comprehensive and effective social protection systems. We also call on them to monitor States’ implementation of their social protection programs and systems in particular, effective oversight on resources and budgets.
We call on governments to take this Charter as a guideline for social policies and to support all initiatives, politically and financially, aimed at achieving the principles of this Charter.
Having read this draft Global Charter for Social Protection Rights, I/we want to endorse this initiative. This support does not concern all the different and detailed points of the twenty principles, which have to be adopted in a national or local context according to the needs of people, but the process to work on social commons in a democratic and participatory way, aimed at contributing to social justice and social transformation.

Dighipara Ultra Super Critical Thermal Power Plant (NWPGCL)



News Clippings
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27 Oct 2017: Government to build 500MW power plant at Dighipara: The Dhaka Tribune
11 Sep 2016: Govt to install 660MW plant at mine mouth of Dighipara: BPDB to sign a MoU with Chinese firm to implement the project: The Daily Sun

Gazaria Coal Power Plant (RPCL-China)



News Clippings
------------------------------------------------

Green Climate Fund (GCF)

Green Climate Fund (GCF), the new multi-billion climate fund, was designated as an operating entity of the financial mechanism of the UNFCCC, in accordance with Article 11 of the UNFCCC. The COP 16 brings the issue into light and after COP 20, now GCF has become successful to a certain extent in initial resource mobilization process that led to the mobilization of $10.3 billion to date by contributing parties. The institution was proposed in 2009 Copenhagen Conference (COP 15), Denmark and formed in 2010 Cancun Conference (COP 16), Mexico. Headquartered in Song-do, South Korea, GCF started funding in late 2015.

GCF Policies
---------------------------------------------------------------
Bangladesh has been very active in the UNFCCC negotiations for long and has also taken a pragmatic approach as soon as the GCF emerged. In September 2014, the government of Bangladesh nominated Economic Relations Division (ERD) of Ministry of Finance as the National Designated Authority (NDA) of Bangladesh to GCF. As per standard procedure, NDAs are chosen by governments to act as the core interface between a country and the Fund. NDAs provide broad oversight of GCF’s activities in a country and serve as the point of communication with the Fund.

Bangladesh has received one of the very first funding through German-base Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW). Since then Bangladesh has received 3 projects from GCF through United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and World Bank.

National Designated Authority (NDA) to GCF
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic Relations Division (ERD), Ministry of Finance, Government of Bangladesh


GCF Accredited Institutions in Bangladesh
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  1. Infrastructure Development Company Limited (IDCOL): Approved on 6 July 2017
  2. Palli Karma-Sahayak Foundation (PKSF): Approved on 2 October 2017

GCF Financed Projects in Bangladesh
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  1. Climate-Resilient Infrastructure Mainstreaming in Bangladesh (FP004): Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW), Germany
  2. Enhancing Adaptive Capacities of Coastal Communities, especially Women, to Cope with Climate Change Induced Salinity (FP069): United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
  3. Global Clean Cooking Program –Bangladesh (FP070): World Bank (WB)

Patuakhali Coal Power Plant




News Clippings
---------------------------------------------------
21 September 2016: Bangladesh: RPCL to build 1,320MW coal-fired power plant in Patuakhali: SteelMint.com

Barisal Coal Based IPP Power Plant (ISO Tech-PCR)



News Clippings
---------------------------------------------------
06 August 2018: Coal-fired power plant in Barguna despite environmental concerns: The Daily NewAge
26 July 2015: Govt now moves to take up medium coal-fired power projects: The Daily Sun

Enhancing Adaptive Capacities of Coastal Communities, especially Women, to Cope with Climate Change Induced Salinity (FP069)

Name of the Project: Enhancing Adaptive Capacities of Coastal Communities, especially Women, to Cope with Climate Change Induced Salinity (FP069)
Project Location: Khulna and Satkhira District, Bangladesh
Number of Beneficiary: 719,229 Persons (about 245,516 direct and 473,713 indirect)
Type of Project: Health, Food and Water Security
Land Acquisition: Not Applicable
ESF Risk Category: B (GCF ESF)
Project Period: 6.0 Years
Financier: Green Climate Fund (GCF)
Executing Agency: Ministry of Women and Children Affairs (MOWCA)
Receiver Entity: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Sponsor: Economic Relations Division (ERD), Ministry of Finance (MOF), Government of Bangladesh

Important Dates
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Proposal Submission: 25 September 2017
First Revision: 14 November 2017
Second Revision: 11 December 2017
Third Revision: 25 January 2018
Final Submission: 16 March 2018
Project Approval: March 2018
Project Starting: 1 July 2018
Project Completion: 30 June 2024

Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Output 1: Climate Resilient Livelihoods, Focusing on Women, for Enhanced Adaptive Capacities of Coastal Agricultural Communities: USD 11,482,100.00;
Output 2: Gender-responsive Access to Year - Round, Safe and Reliable Climate-resilient Drinking Water Solutions: USD 13,981,515.00;
Output 3: Strengthened Institutional Capacities Knowledge and Learning for Climate-risk Informed Management of Livelihoods and Drinking Water Security: USD 4,025,435.00


Financing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Size of the Project: Small
Total Budget: USD 33.0 Million
GCF Investment (Grant): USD 24.98 Million
UNDP Investment (Grant): N.A.
GOB Contribution (in Cash): USD 7.00 Million
GOB Contribution (in Kind): USD 1.00 Million

Sector of Investment: Climate Change Adaptation

Short Description
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Strengthening the adaptive capacity of coastal communities, especially women, to cope with the impacts of climate-induced salinity on their livelihoods and water security.

The coastal belt of Bangladesh is vulnerable to cyclones, storm surges, and sea-level rise, which have recently been observed to be becoming more intense. Increased occurrence of these hazards is accelerating saltwater intrusion into the fresh water resources along Bangladesh's coastline.

The strengthening of adaptive capacities in this project is projected to reduce the adverse impacts to agricultural livelihoods that are freshwater dependent, and to address the availability and quality of drinking water in vulnerable coastal communities. This community-based approach in planning and managing climate-resilient water supply targets the highly vulnerable, specifically women and girls.

Contact Persons
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Adriana Dinu
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Tel: +1 212 906 5143
Email: adriana.dinu@undp.org

Lucas Black
Tel: +1 212 906 5842
Email: lucas.black@undp.org

Srilata Kammila
Regional Technical Specialist - Adaptation
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Phone: +66 2 304 9100 Ext. 5264; Email: srilata.kammila@undp.org
United Nations Service Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue
Bangkok 10200, Thailand

Kazi Shofiqul Azam
Secretary, Economic Relations Division
Phone: +88 02 9113 743, +88 02 9133 489
Email: secretary@erd.gov.bd

Related NGOs
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Abdul Momen Khan Memorial Foundation (Khan Foundation), Climate Action Network South Asia (CANSA), Coastal Association for Social Transformation Trust (Coast Trust), Development Wheel (DEW), Gana Unnayan Kendra (GUK), Independent University Bangladesh (IUB), Jago Nari, Maleya Foundation, Trinamul Unnayan Sangstha (TUS)

Climate-Resilient Infrastructure Mainstreaming in Bangladesh (FP004)

Name of the Project: Climate-Resilient Infrastructure Mainstreaming in Bangladesh
Project Location: Barguna, Bhola and Satkhira District, Bangladesh
Number of Beneficiary: 10,534,350 persons
Type of Project: Infrastructure and Built Environment
Land Acquisition: Not Applicable
ESF Risk Category: B (GCF)
Project Period: 6.0 years
Financier: Green Climate Fund (GCF)
Executing Agency: Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Government of Bangladesh
Receiver: Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW)
Sponsor: Economic Relations Division (ERD), Ministry of Finance (MOF), Government of Bangladesh

Important Dates
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Proposal Submission: 3 August 2015
First Revision: 31 August 2015
Second Revision: 10 September 2015
Third Revision: 25 September 2015
Final Submission: 15 October 2015
Project Approval: November 2015 (Decision Number: B.11/11)
Project Starting: 1 April 2016 (Revised: 16 March 2018)
Project Completion: 31 March 2022 (Revised: 15 March 2024)

Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Knowledge Management: USD 6.0 Million; Guidelines, Standards & Procedures: 3.0 Million; Communication, Consultation and Training: 3.0 Million; Initiate Development of a Permanent Institutional Structure: USD 1.0 Million; Priority Multipurpose Cyclone Shelter: USD 26.5 Million; Critical Rural Road Connectivity: USD 10.5 Million; Climate Resilient Urban Infrastructure in Satkhira: USD 18.0 Million; Project Management at LGED: USD 4.5 Million; Institutional Development, Design, Management & Supervision (C1 & C2): USD 5.5 Million; Design, Management & Supervision (C3): 2.0 Million: Total 80.0 Million


Financing
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Size of the Project: Medium (USD 50 - 250 Million)
Total Budget: USD 80.0 Million
GCF Investment (Grant): USD 40.0 Million
BMZ/KfW Investment (Grant): USD 15.0 Million
GOB Investment (Contribution): USD 25.0 Million

Sector of Investment: Climate Change Adaptation

Short Description
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Providing cyclone shelters and safeguarding critical road access to protect lives in a rural coastal region of Bangladesh. Developing urban infrastructure and safeguarding vulnerable city-dwellers from climate risk. Establishing a national centre of excellence for climate resilience infrastructure, to inform and guide future infrastructure development throughout the country.

Bangladesh is one of the world’s most vulnerable countries to climate risk, notably to cyclones and floods. Coastal districts are particularly at risk from extreme weather, a risk which will be exacerbated by climate change impacts such as increased seasonal variation, higher precipitation levels, and rising sea levels. Three of the country’s most vulnerable and poor coastal districts are targeted by the project: Bhola, Barguna, and Satkhira.

The project establishes a national center of excellence to gather, develop, and share climate resilience infrastructure knowledge. Rural infrastructure development will be supported by constructing 45 new cyclone shelters and renovating 20 existing shelters. The shelters built under this project will be used as primary schools in normal times, providing 45 additional schools and helping educate 18,590 children. The improvement of 80 km of critical access roads to the rural shelters will also be undertaken, to safeguard access during extreme weather and enhance the adaptive capacities of local communities.

Pilot climate-resilient urban infrastructure projects will also be undertaken in the city of Satkhira. Urban projects may include improvements to drainage, flood protection, sanitation, water supply, and transport, with priority given to the most vulnerable such as the inhabitants of city slums.

Basic Documents
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  1. GCF: Funding Proposal: Climate Resilient Infrastructure Mainstreaming in Bangladesh (FP004)
  2. GCF: Gender Assessment: Climate Resilient Infrastructure Mainstreaming in Bangladesh (FP004)

Contact Persons
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Johannes Scholl
Project Manager, Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW)
Address: Palmengartenstr. 5-9, 60325 Frankfurt, Germany
Phone: +49 69 7431 8935; Email: Johannes.scholl@kfw.de

Matthias Börner
Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW)
matthias.boerner@kfw.de

Dr. Martina Jung
martina.jung@kfw.de

Kazi Shofiqul Azam
Secretary, Economic Relations Division
Phone: +88 02 9113 743, +88 02 9133 489
Email: secretary@erd.gov.bd

Related NGOs
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Abdul Momen Khan Memorial Foundation (Khan Foundation), Climate Action Network South Asia (CANSA), Coastal Association for Social Transformation Trust (Coast Trust), Development Wheel (DEW), Gana Unnayan Kendra (GUK), Independent University Bangladesh (IUB), Jago Nari, Maleya Foundation, Trinamul Unnayan Sangstha (TUS)

Acronyms
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BMZ: Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (Bundesministerium für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung)
GOB: Government of Bangladesh
KfW: Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (Reconstruction Credit Institute)

225 MW Power Project in Bhola: Indian Shapoorji to relocate its installed plant

Manjurul Ahsan | Daily Newage |  3 July 2015, 12:38 am 
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The government is likely to allow Mumbai-based Shapoorji Pallonji Group to relocate a 225 MW power plant, which is already installed in India, to Bhola in Bangladesh without a tender. Shapoorji Pallonji Infrastructure Capital Company Limited, a subsidiary of the group, claimed Tk 3 (3.8431 US cents) for supplying each unit or kilowatt-hour of electricity to the state-run Power Development Board for 15 years, officials said. 

The power and energy ministry at a meeting on June 24 approved a proposal of gas supply to the plant for 15 years from Shahbajpur gas field in Bhola, which is not connected to the national grid for gas transmission, they said. The project would be implemented under the controversial Speedy Supply of Power and Energy (Special Provisions) Act, 2010 which has been criticised as the law gives indemnity to the officials and policymakers from investigation and prosecution. 

PDB chairman Md Shahinul Islam Khan on Thursday told New Age that the authorities concerned were working on the proposal of SP Infra Capital LTD which was yet to obtain final approval from the government. He said that PDB, in course of negotiations, would consider the prices quoted in the recent bids for electricity supply from gas-fired power plants. 

When asked, he said that SP Infra Capital LTD was halfway towards the installation of the plant in India. ‘So far I was informed that the company lately decided not to continue with the project there due to uncertainty in gas supply,’ Shahinur said. 

The private companies, in recent tenders, offered electricity at the rate of Tk 2-2.5 per unit from gas-fired power plants. Besides the proposal of SP Infra Capital LTD, the government is dealing with at least two more power projects of Indian private companies, all without any tenders. 

The PDB, on June 6, signed two memorandums of understanding with India’s Reliance Power Ltd and Adani Power Ltd to set up two large power plants with a combined generation capacity of 4,600 MW in Bangladesh skirting tenders. Gujrat-based Adani Power Limited plans to build a 1,600 MW coal-fired plant with an investment of US$ 2.5 billion. Reliance Power Limited plans to invest US$ 3 billion in an integrated facility comprising of a 3,000 MW power plant based on imported liquefied natural gas. 

SP Infra Capital Ltd entered into power business in 2001 through a 105 MW liquid fuel-fired power plant in Tamil Nadu. The company is now constructing a 2,640 MW coal-fired power plant in Gujarat, according to the company’s website. Another Indian private company LANCO Infrastructure earlier failed to install a 225 MW power plant in Bhola as it failed to mobilize funds required for the project. 

Now, PDB is operating a 225 MW power plant and a local private firm Venture Energy Resources Ltd is operating a 34 MW plant using the natural gas of Shahbajpur field in Bhola. At the June 26 meeting, the ministry decided to supply gas to the power plant of SP Infra Capital LTD skirting the provision of claiming penalty from the Sundarban Gas Company Ltd if it fails to supply gas. SGCL solely depends on Shahabjpur field for supplying the gas. 

The PDB will not give capacity payment to the power supplier if it fails to supply electricity for the shortage of gas supply, according to the meeting decision.